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Health Care Economics and Organizations

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2013

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National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2013 is the 17th edition of this annual publication. It provides an overview of how much is spent on health care every year, what and whom that money is used for, and where it comes from. It features comparative expenditure data at the provincial/territorial and international levels, as well as Canadian health spending trends from 1975 to the present.
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Building better health care: Policy opportunities for Ontario

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The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity finds that, overall, Ontario could get better value for money from its health care spending. Ontario is among the jurisdictions with the highest total per capita health care spending in the OECD, with spending 33 percent above the OECD average. Yet despite exceptional resources, Ontario falls short when comparing the province’s overall health care performance to that of international peers. Countries that spend less on health care have comparable or better health care outcomes, higher quality care, and more extensive public coverage than Ontario.
Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Canadian Rx Atlas (3rd edition)

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The 3rd edition of The Canadian Rx Atlas breaks down retail spending on prescription drugs Canada, providing a detailed portrait of the factors driving spending trends over time and variations across provinces. The Atlas gives a first-ever portrait of age- and sex-specific patterns of prescription drug use and costs across provinces. It also provides first-of-kind estimates of the source of financing for the prescriptions filled in every province. Unique to the Canadian Rx Atlas, these details are not provided simply for all spending on prescription drugs; it also provides these details for each of 33 clinically and economically important therapeutic categories.
Friday, February 28, 2014

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2012

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Drug spending continues to increase in Canada; overall annual growth has slowed to its lowest rate in 16 years. Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2012 updates trends in drug spending in Canada, primarily from retail establishments, in total, by public and private payers, and by type of drug (prescribed and non-prescribed). Provincial/territorial and international comparisons are included. Companion Products Data Tables, 1985 to 2012 (https://secure.cihi.ca/estore/productFamily.htm?locale=en&pf=PFC2146&lang=en&media=0)
Monday, May 6, 2013

Provincial Healthcare Index 2013 (Studies in HEALTH POLICY)

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The Fraser Institute’s Provincial Healthcare Index 2013 uses publically available data for the year 2010 (or the most recent year available) to measure the provision of healthcare in comparison to healthcare expenditures across provinces in Canada. The value for money that provinces receive can be thought of as consisting of two, equally important parts: [1] provision of healthcare (the value) and [2] expenditure on healthcare (the cost). The provision of healthcare is captured using 46 indicators, aggregated into four broad components: [1] availability of resources; [2] use of resources; [3] access to resources; [4] clinical performance of medical goods and services in each province.
Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011

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Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 updates trends in drug spending in Canada, primarily from retail establishments, in total, by public and private payers, and by type of drug (prescribed and non-prescribed). Provincial/territorial and international comparisons are included.
Thursday, May 24, 2012

Health Systems Evidence

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Health Systems Evidence is a search tool to support policymakers, stakeholders and researchers interested in strategies to strengthen or reform health systems or in how to get cost-effective programs, services and drugs to those who need them. This search tool is available in the following seven languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. Health Systems Evidence provides the option for users to subscribe to a customizable evidence service that will provide monthly email alerts identifying new documents available in the database specific to someone’s individual interests. The tool is free to use, but registration is required.
Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Four Pillars: Recommendations for Achieving a High Performing Health System

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Developed by the Ontario Association of Community Care Access Centres (OACCAC), and the Ontario Hospital Association (OHA), the paper identifies the strategic challenges facing Ontario’s health care system, and outlines the actions that must be taken to ensure it can meet the access and quality of care needs of patients in today’s challenging economic environment. The pillars are: Setting Ambitious Goals; Planning Properly; Letting Evidence Drive Care Decisions; and, Connecting Care
Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Strengthening Health Systems Through Innovation: Lessons Learned

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The purpose of this white paper from the Richard Ivey School of Business International Centre for Health Innovation is to examine the progress made within the health systems of seven comparator countries to learn how they have been able to help meet population health needs more effectively and make progress in health system redesign and transformation. The authors consider that Canada has made less progress in meeting health care demands and can learn from other countries.
Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Ideas and Opportunities for Bending the Health Care Cost Curve: Advice for the Government of Ontario

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Released in 2010 in partnership with the Ontario Association of Community Care Access Centres and the Ontario Federation of Community Mental Health and Addiction Programs, Ideas and Opportunities for Bending the Health Care Cost Curve: Advice for the Government of Ontario was a business case approach to help the province deal with growing health care demands in the face of constrained budgets. The report outlined 16 tangible and evidence-based recommendations to find efficiencies while improving access and quality of care. Among them were strategies to better manage costly chronic illnesses, appropriately shift services from hospitals to the community, as well as lower physician and drug expenditures to be more in line with those of other provinces.
Thursday, February 16, 2012
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